The missing middle in data science

Over a year back, when I had just moved to London and was job-hunting, I was getting frustrated by the fact that potential employers didn’t recognise my combination of skills of wrangling data and analysing businesses. A few saw me purely as a business guy, and most saw me purely as a data guy, trying to slot me into machine learning roles I was thoroughly unsuited for.

Around this time, I happened to mention to my wife about this lack of fit, and she had then remarked that the reason companies either want pure business people or pure data people is that you can’t scale a business with people with a unique combination of skills. “There are possibly very few people with your combination of skills”, she had said, and hence companies had gotten around the problem by getting some very good business people and some very good data people, and hope that they can add value together.

More recently, I was talking to her about some of the problems that she was dealing with at work, and recognised one of them as being similar to what I had solved for a client a few years ago. I quickly took her through the fundamentals of K-means clustering, and showed her how to implement it in R (and in the process, taught her the basics of R). As it had with my client many years ago, clustering did its magic, and the results were literally there to see, the business problem solved. My wife, however, was unimpressed. “This requires too much analytical work on my part”, she said, adding that “If I have to do with this level of analytical work, I won’t have enough time to execute my managerial duties”.

This made me think about the (yet unanswered) question of who should be solving this kind of a problem – to take a business problem, recognise it can be solved using data, figuring out the right technique to apply to it, and then communicating the results in a way that the business can easily understand. And this was a one-time problem, not something you would need to solve repeatedly, and so without the requirement to set up a pipeline and data engineering and IT infrastructure around it.

I admit this is just one data point (my wife), but based on observations from elsewhere, managers are usually loathe to get their hands dirty with data, beyond perhaps doing some basic MS Excel work. Data science specialists, on the other hand, will find it hard to quickly get intuition for a one-time problem, get data in a “dirty” manner, and then apply the right technique to solving it, and communicate the results in a business-friendly manner. Moreover, data scientists are highly likely to be involved in regular repeatable activities, making it an organisational nightmare to “lease” them for such one-time efforts.

This is what I call as the “missing middle problem” in data science. Problems whose solutions will without doubt add value to the business, but which most businesses are unable to address because of a lack of adequate skillset in solving the issue; and whose one-time nature makes it difficult for businesses to dedicate permanent resources to solve.

I guess so far this post has all the makings of a sales pitch, so let me turn it into one – this is precisely the kind of problem that my company Bespoke Data Insights is geared to solving. We specialise in solving problems that lie at the cusp of business and data. We provide end-to-end quantitative solutions for typically one-time business problems.

We come in, understand your business needs, and use a hypothesis-driven approach to model the problem in data terms. We select methods that in our opinion are best suited for the precise problem, not hesitating to build our own models if necessary (hence the Bespoke in the name). And finally, we synthesise the analysis in the form of recommendations that any business person can easily digest and action on.

So – if you’re facing a business problem where you think data might help, but don’t know how to proceed; or if you are curious about all this talk about AI and ML and data science and all that, and want to include it in your business; or you want your business managers to figure out how to use the data ┬áteams better, hire us.